Tag Archives: mystery

Spellbook of the Lost and Found — Moïra Fowley-Doyle

24 Oct

 

Publisher: Penguin Random House
Released: June 1st, 2017
Genre: YA, mystery, supernatural
Source: Finished copy from publisher

 

 

One stormy summer night, Olive and her best friend, Rose, begin to lose things. It starts with simple items like hair clips and jewellery, but soon it’s clear that Rose has lost something bigger; something she won’t talk about.

Then Olive meets three wild, mysterious strangers: Ivy, Hazel and Rowan. Like Rose, they’re mourning losses – and holding tight to secrets.

When they discover the ancient spellbook, full of hand-inked charms to conjure back lost things, they realise it might be their chance to set everything right. Unless it’s leading them towards secrets that were never meant to be found . . .

From Goodreads

Ooooh how to talk about this book without giving anything away!  Okay, here goes…

This book has a really cool and unique concept and made me realize that I really need to read more books with spellbooks and charms and the likes. I really like the idea of the give and take of the charms and also the fact that when it comes to the supernatural, what you see usually isn’t all that you get.

All of the plots were captivating and I felt like I was right along with the characters, trying to figure things out. The characters were well-written and I really liked that each was dealing with their own crap while also dealing with crap as a group.

There is a twist towards the end of the book (don’t worry, no spoilers here!) and I felt that once it was revealed, the pacing was a bit rushed. I would have liked to have seen more emotional reaction from the characters. Everyone seems to just accept the twist and continue one, which didn’t ring 100% true to me.

With that being said, this book is definitely one that I would recommend. The writing is tight, the concept really cool and over all it was a great YA read.

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So Much Love — Rebecca Rosenblum

10 Oct

 

Publisher:McClelland & Stewart
Released: March 14th, 2017
Genre: Mystery, thriller
Source: Finished copy from publisher

 

 

When a young woman named Catherine Reindeer vanishes without a trace from her small town, those who know her are left to cope with her absence. Moving back and forth from her outer circle of acquaintances to her closest intimates, Rebecca Rosenblum’s first novel reveals how the lives of those left behind can be overturned in the wake of an unexplained disappearance. But at the heart of the novel is Catherine’s own surprising story of resilience and recovery.

When a final devastating loss after months of captivity forces her to make a bold decision, she is unprepared for everything that follows her dramatic escape. Woven throughout are stories about a local female poet who was murdered decades earlier, a woman whose life and work become a lifeline for Catherine during her darkest hours—and who may ultimately hold the key to Catherine’s quest to find solace in the aftermath of unimaginable tragedy.

So Much Love is a haunting novel of longing and loss, the necessity of bearing witness, and how the stories we tell have the power to shape our lives.

From Goodreads

 

This mystery was different from any other mystery I have ever read. The multiple POV and story of two different tragedies, for another author, would be too much and too confusing. But Rosenblum handles both elements and presents a book that is deeply tragic but also, at times, uplifting. And it never feels too busy or over done.

There are some scenes in this book that were difficult to read because of their subject matter and the rawness in the telling. But it’s these scenes that actually give the book the depth that it has. Besides being a stellar mystery, So Much Love is also a character study on how different people deal with tragedy.

So Much Love is a very difficult book to describe due to its uniqueness. All I can say is this is definitely one you will want to read.

Fractured — Catherine McKenzie

4 Oct

 

Publisher: Lake Union
Released: Oct 4th, 2016
Genre: Mystery
Source: Purchased copy

 

Julie Prentice and her family move across the country to the idyllic Mount Adams district of Cincinnati, hoping to evade the stalker who’s been terrorizing them ever since the publication of her bestselling novel, The Murder Game. Since Julie doesn’t know anyone in her new town, when she meets her neighbor John Dunbar, their instant connection brings measured hope for a new beginning. But she never imagines that a simple, benign conversation with him could set her life spinning so far off course.

After a series of misunderstandings, Julie and her family become the target of increasingly unsettling harassment. Has Julie’s stalker found her, or are her neighbors out to get her, too? As tension in the neighborhood rises, new friends turn into enemies, and the results are deadly.

From Goodreads

 

McKenzie is one of my fave authors and I have loved ALL of her books. Smart chick-lit with believable characters and plots that may seem somewhat extraordinary at first glance but that she writes with such heart and honestly that they are 100% believable. Fracture is a mystery and a departure from her usual genre, but she writes it with her usual approachable style. Some authors aren’t successful in genre-jumping, but this isn’t the case here at all. Fracture is a well written, well thought out mystery that I absolutely devoured.

These days I’m all about what I call “flash back” mysteries. You know, the ones where the book isn’t told in a linear fashion. We get a glimpse of something that’s happened and then we get some background on what lead up to it. We’re in the dark about what exactly took place, what the trigger event is, until close to the end. And there’s usually a WTF twist. I have been OBSESSED with this kind of mystery lately. Fracture does this brilliantly. For me, it’s the perfect example of this type of story telling. And writing this type of book isn’t easy. McKenzie kept me interested and wondering what the heck was going on without leaving me so confused I was frustrated. I am always in awe of authors who can do this.

I’m also a big fan of the unreliable narrator. This is a dual narrated book and although both narrators are dealing with the same story, their telling isn’t quite the same. I think that this kind of narrator is so true to real life. And it makes the puzzle of the story even more challenging to figure out.

If you are a fan of authors like Ruth Ware and Paula Hawkins, then you will definitely love Fractured.

The Child — Fiona Barton

31 Aug

 

Publisher: Penguin Random House
Released: June 27th, 2017
Genre: Mystery, suspense
Source: Finished copy from publisher

 

As an old house is demolished in a gentrifying section of London, a workman discovers a tiny skeleton, buried for years. For journalist Kate Waters, it’s a story that deserves attention. She cobbles together a piece for her newspaper, but at a loss for answers, she can only pose a question: Who is the Building Site Baby?

As Kate investigates, she unearths connections to a crime that rocked the city decades earlier: A newborn baby was stolen from the maternity ward in a local hospital and was never found. Her heartbroken parents were left devastated by the loss.

But there is more to the story, and Kate is drawn—house by house—into the pasts of the people who once lived in this neighborhood that has given up its greatest mystery. And she soon finds herself the keeper of unexpected secrets that erupt in the lives of three women—and torn between what she can and cannot tell…

From Goodreads

 

Oh the twists, the twists, the twists!!!!!

This was an awesome mystery novel and let me tell you, the final twist? I so didn’t see it coming. I literally said “WHAT?” out loud. It caught me completely by surprise and I love that that happened.

It’s hard to talk about it without giving anything away. All of the characters were believable and I love how the author weaves everything together. Everything unfolds at a nice pace and nothing seemed rush or really hectic. The format was more traditional than most of the mysteries I’ve read lately and it reminded me that while I love a mystery with an unreliable narrator, I also love a mystery that moves slower and delves deeper into characters. The pacing and the tone reminded me a lot of the TV show Broadchurch, which is my fave mystery show. I definitely want to read more from this author.

 

Are You Sleeping? — Kathleen Barber

7 Aug

 

Publisher: Simon & Schuster Canada
Released: Aug 1st, 2017
Genre: Mystery, suspense
Source: ARC from publisher

 

Serial meets Ruth Ware’s In A Dark, Dark Wood in this inventive and twisty psychological thriller about a mega-hit podcast that reopens a murder case—and threatens to unravel the carefully constructed life of the victim’s daughter.

The only thing more dangerous than a lie…is the truth.

Josie Buhrman has spent the last ten years trying to escape her family’s reputation and with good reason. After her father’s murder thirteen years prior, her mother ran away to join a cult and her twin sister Lanie, once Josie’s closest friend and confidant, betrayed her in an unimaginable way. Now, Josie has finally put down roots in New York, settling into domestic life with her partner Caleb, and that’s where she intends to stay. The only problem is that she has lied to Caleb about every detail of her past—starting with her last name.

When investigative reporter Poppy Parnell sets off a media firestorm with a mega-hit podcast that reopens the long-closed case of Josie’s father’s murder, Josie’s world begins to unravel. Meanwhile, the unexpected death of Josie’s long-absent mother forces her to return to her Midwestern hometown where she must confront the demons from her past—and the lies on which she has staked her future.

From Goodreads

 

My husband and I binge watched How to Make a Murderer over three nights. We were OBSESSED. Looked things up online, talked about the show, the people involved, who was guilty and who was innocent. But never once did I consider the impact the show had on those involved. That people who live in the area or close by would rubberneck and check out the area and the people who were impacted by the murder. And that’s the key thing I took away from Are You Sleeping?.  While it is a mystery/suspense novel, it also deals with how invasive our society can be, how everyone is looking for their fifteen minutes of fame and how commenting online on something that is really happening can be harsh.

It also deals with families and relationships with relatives. The character description and building was spot on. How Josie interacted with people in her hometown was just as captivating as the mystery in the book.

This is the perfect psychological thriller. It’s very twisty and turny and there is more than one thing that needed to be puzzled out and I love that. The plot is very dynamic but there isn’t so much going on that the pacing got bogged down.

I really enjoy books that make me think, regardless of the genre. Are You Sleeping? is the perfect example of this. This is a book with a delicious mystery and other plot aspects that will really make you think.

Our Little Secret — Roz Nay

4 Aug

 

Publisher: Simon & Schuster
Released: June 6th, 2016
Genre: Mystery, thriller
Source: ARC from publisher

 

 

For fans of In a Dark, Dark Wood and All the Missing Girls comes Our Little Secret, a compulsive and thrilling debut about a missing woman, a tangled love triangle, the secrets we keep and the secrets we share.

The detective wants to know what happened to Saskia, as if I could just skip to the ending and all would be well. But stories begin at the beginning and some secrets have to be earned.

Angela is being held in a police interrogation room. Her ex’s wife has gone missing and Detective Novak is sure Angela knows something, despite her claim that she’s not involved.

At Novak’s prodding, Angela tells a story going back ten years, explaining how she met and fell in love with her high school friend HP. But as her past unfolds, she reveals a disconcerting love triangle and a dark, tangled web of betrayals. Is Angela a scorned ex-lover with criminal intent? Or a pawn in someone else’s revenge scheme? Who is she protecting? And why?

Twisty and suspenseful, Our Little Secret is an intense cat-and-mouse game and a riveting thriller about the lies we tell others—and ourselves.

 

From Goodreads

 

If I had to describe Our Little Secret in one word, that word would be delicious. The voice of Angela, the narrator, is one of my favorite this year. It’s so hard to know if she’s telling the truth or batshit crazy and I LOVED it. Not only did I not know whether to believe her or not, I got the sense that she herself wasn’t sure whether or not to believe what she was saying.

I also love how the story is laid out. In a way it reminded me of The Usual Suspects in that there was a back and forth between the actual interrogation and the past.

I felt off kilter during the whole book. It was like I had no problem following the story but I really wasn’t sure what was going on. As I have discovered this year, this is my fave type of mystery.

And I just have to take a moment to talk about the name Saskia. LOVE IT.

I’ve read In a Dark Dark Wood and yes, if you like that then you’ll absolutely love Our Little Secret.

Blog Tour — The Party — Robyn Harding

9 Jun

 

I am so freaking HAPPY to be a part of this blog tour! Robyn was sweet enough to answer some questions, and below our interview you’ll find my review of The Party.

Hi Robyn! Thanks so much for stopping by the blog and answering some questions. 🙂

Lavender Lines: Coffee or tea?

Robyn: Coffee. 1.5 cups with honey and milk.

LL: Do you have any writing rituals? (Fave place, certain music you listen to, etc.)

R: I have a cheerful, sunny little office in my home that I rarely use. Despite having had a professional ergonomic assessment of my workspace, my neck and shoulders seize up when I sit at my desk. Now I am mostly on the couch with my laptop, but I just bought a cardboard standup desk. I am hoping for the best!

I am most creative in the morning. After my husband and kids leave for work/school, I pour my coffee, grab my laptop, and start writing. I don’t shower, dress, brush my teeth… I pity anyone who comes to my door before 10:00 A.M.

LL: Some of the main characters in The Party are, well, not really nice people. Was it hard to write unlikeable characters in a way that would keep readers interested?

R: It was fun! I had never written such odious characters before. I love reading books about nasty people. I don’t need to like the characters, I just need to be interested in them. In The Party, everyone has secrets, everyone has issues, everyone has a motive…. I hope this will keep readers’ attention, even if they hate every character.

LL: Where did the idea for The Party come from?

R: I have two teenaged kids, so underage drinking is a relevant issue in my life. I talked to other parents of teens and found wildly differing opinions on substance use. Some parents are zero tolerance, while other take the “they’re going to drink anyway, I’d rather they do it at home” approach. This made me imagine the worst-case scenario of kids partying at home, and how parents would really deal with that fall out. I also thought it would be fun to have this happen to strict parents who are truly blindsided.

LL: Can you tell us about anything you’re working on now?

R: I’m writing a novel inspired by Canada’s most notorious serial killer, Karla Homolka. She has served her time and is now free, a mother of three, and living a normal family life in Quebec. With this book, I’m confronting some hard questions: Can people really change? Do they deserve a second chance? And can you ever outrun your past?

LL: Again, thanks so much for popping by!

R: And thank you so much for the interview!

 

 

 

 

Publisher: Simon & Schuster Canada
Released: June 6th, 2017
Genre: Mystery, literature
Source: ARC from publisher

 

Sweet sixteen. It’s an exciting coming of age, a milestone, and a rite of passage. Jeff and Kim Sanders plan on throwing a party for their daughter, Hannah—a sweet girl with good grades and nice friends. Rather than an extravagant, indulgent affair, they invite four girls over for pizza, cake, movies, and a sleepover. What could possibly go wrong?

But things do go wrong, horrifically so. After a tragic accident occurs, Jeff and Kim’s flawless life in a wealthy San Francisco suburb suddenly begins to come apart. In the ugly aftermath, friends become enemies, dark secrets are revealed in the Sanders’ marriage, and the truth about their perfect daughter, Hannah, is exposed.

Harkening to Herman Koch’s The Dinner, Christos Tsiolkas’s The Slap, and Liane Moriarty’s Big Little Lies, The Party takes us behind the façade of the picture-perfect family, exposing the lies, betrayals, and moral lapses that neighbors don’t see—and the secrets that children and parents keep from themselves and each other.

From Goodreads

Holy Hell, fellow book nerds! This book was a super great read, but I am afeared it will be hard to review, because the thing I like the best about it is the ending and I sure as heck don’t want to give that away. All I will say about the ending is that it is one of the most surprising and OMG endings I’ve read in a long, long time and I absolutely love it.

The second thing I love the most about this book is something I can talk about, and that’s the fact that pretty much every character in the book, in one way or another, is a douchenozzle. I am not one of those readers that has to like main characters in order to enjoy and like the book, nope. This was a favorite read for me, but my God I definitely wouldn’t want to meet any of these characters.

Writing a riveting book with unlikable characters is a hard hard thing to do, I imagine, and Harding does it wonderfully. I read this book in two sittings and when I was done I spent some time thinking about the characters and their motivations behind what they did. Even now, writing the review weeks after I read it, I can’t help but think back on it and wonder not only about their actions in the book, but also what their actions would be AFTER the book.

If you are looking for an engaging, make-you-think read, you can’t go wrong with The Party.