Archive | July, 2017

Gizelle’s Bucket List — Lauren Fern Watt

26 Jul

 

Publisher: Simon & Schuster
Released: March 7th, 2017
Genre: Memoir
Source: ARC from publisher

 

The playful, epic adventure of a 160-pound English Mastiff and the twentysomething girl who grew up alongside her—Marley & Me for a whole new generation.

Lauren Watt took her 160-pound English Mastiff to college—so of course after graduation, Gizelle followed Lauren to her first, tiny apartment in New York. Because Gizelle wasn’t just a dog; she was a roommate, sister, confidante, dining companion, and everything in between.

Together, Gizelle and Lauren went through boyfriends, first jobs, a mother’s struggle with addiction, and the ups and downs of becoming an adult in the big city. But when Gizelle got sick and Lauren realized her best friend might not be such a constant after all, she designed an epic bucket list to make the absolute most of the time they had left.

Bursting with charm, this unique, coming-of-age story of a girl making her way through life is a testament to the special way pets inspire us to live better, love better, and appreciate the simple pleasures. Gizelle’s Bucket List is the humorous, poignant lesson our pets teach us: to embrace adventure, love unconditionally, and grow into the people we want to be.

From Goodreads

 

I do animal rescue and rehab. My husband and I take in sick and needy cats and in the spring we take in injured or orphaned animals and birds and raise them until they can be released. I currently have two senior rescued dogs that are near the end of their lives. I love a lot of sick and dying animals. Give them the best life they can have.  So I jumped at the change to read this book.

I really, really enjoyed it, but I didn’t love it. I think it’s the kind of book that any animal love will like but it wasn’t quite what I was expecting. I was expecting more of the book to deal with Gizelle’s bucket list.

The writing and storytelling was solid, but for me there was something missing. I think I would have liked more depth to the story. (FYI I always feel SUPER WEIRD reviewing memoirs.) What I mean is I think I would have liked a bit less about before Gizelle got sick. It was those chapters dealing with the bucket list that really drew me in and kept me glued to the book.

With that being said, I still recommend this for anyone who loves animals or has had to say good-bye to a beloved pet.

The Happiness Equation — Neil Pasricha

24 Jul

 

Publisher: Penguin Random House
Released: March 8th, 2016
Genre: Self-help, nonfiction
Source: Book from publisher

 

What’s the formula for a happy life?  

Neil Pasricha is a Harvard MBA, a Walmart executive, a New York Times–bestselling author, and a husband and dad. After selling more than a million copies of his Book of Awesome series, he now shifts his focus from observation to application.

In The Happiness Equation, Pasricha illustrates how to want nothing, do anything, and have everything. If that sounds like a contradiction, you simply haven’t unlocked the 9 Secrets to Happiness.

Each secret takes a common ideal, flips it on its head, and casts it in a completely new light. Pasricha then goes a step further by providing step-by-step guidelines and hand-drawn scribbles that illustrate exactly how to apply each secret to live a happier life today.

Controversial? Maybe. Counterintuitive? Definitely.

The Happiness Equation will teach you such principles as:
· Why success doesn’t lead to happiness 
· How to make more money than a Harvard MBA 
· Why multitasking is a myth 
· How eliminating options leads to more choice

The Happiness Equation is a book that will change how you think about everything—your time, your career, your relationships, your family, and, ultimately, of course, your happiness. 

From Goodreads

 

I kinda love this book. HARD. I’ve read it twice, have things highlighted, took notes and quite often will just grab it off my shelve and flip open to a page and read. It’s that kind of self-help book. Now, don’t go rolling your eyes at the term “self-help”. And really, I guess that’s not the right term. Self-improvement would be better. This book approaches happiness in a concrete way with doable things rather than “just think happy thoughts”.

I really like the way that Pasrischa broke things down in digestible bits. It made it easier to absorb the information and just pick the book up and start reading from anywhere.

Some of the ideas in the book are pretty simple but life-changing and have really helped me. (The internal vs external motivation idea is something I come back to for everything.)

The writing style is very engaging and not once did I feel myself skimming or skipping over any parts. I also found myself smiling and nodding a lot while reading and even reading some parts out loud to my husband.

Anyone searching for ways to me happier with life (and really, who isn’t?) should definitely give this book a read.